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Writer, editor, etc. For more information, see jaygabler.com.

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"Mary Gabler née Walker was not a whore, Anglo or otherwise. She was a very pretty twenty-six-year-old community relations manager for Wells Fargo Bank, who lived in Mendota Heights with her husband of fifteen months, and who agreed to meet me at a coffeehouse not far from the Mendakota Country Club—but only if I promised to call her ‘Muffie.’ ‘That’s what they called me all through grade school,’ she said. ‘High school, too. Probably my mother just started calling me that when I was an infant and it stuck. She still calls me that. So does my family, some old friends, too. Only the people I’ve met since I went to Notre Dame call me Mary."

My aunt Mary “Muffie” Gabler appears as a semi-fictionalized character in David Housewright’s The Devil May Care. This whole passage is accurate except that Muffie’s in her 50s, she’s been married for about 30 years, she lives in St. Paul instead of Mendota Heights, she went to the University of Minnesota instead of Notre Dame, and everyone calls her Muffie.

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"I began an epic on Cuchulain and another on Finn, in English hexameters and in fourteeners respectively. Luckily they were abandoned before these easy and vulgar metres had time to spoil my ear."

C.S. Lewis’s—unironic—memoir of his teenage years.

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I just started reading this book. I looked it up and saw that Michener published it at age 75; before he died, at age 90, he published TWELVE MORE BOOKS.

What was that you were saying about feeling old?

I just started reading this book. I looked it up and saw that Michener published it at age 75; before he died, at age 90, he published TWELVE MORE BOOKS.

What was that you were saying about feeling old?

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thetangential:

It’s here! Our new book Bright Lights, Twin Cities, published by Thought Catalog, is now available via iBooks and Amazon. If you enjoy what you read on this Tumblr, you’ll dig this summer read—whether you’re a native Minnesotan or just Gopher-curious.

I co-edited this new book with Becky Lang, Colleen Powers, and Katie Sisneros. Good stuff!

thetangential:

It’s here! Our new book Bright Lights, Twin Cities, published by Thought Catalog, is now available via iBooks and Amazon. If you enjoy what you read on this Tumblr, you’ll dig this summer read—whether you’re a native Minnesotan or just Gopher-curious.

I co-edited this new book with Becky Lang, Colleen Powers, and Katie Sisneros. Good stuff!

Reblogged from thetangential with 25 notes | Permalink

"

The motel alarm jolted me awake. I lay staring at the digital red 4:00 winking from beside the bed, wondering where I was. Corinth. Corinth, Mississippi. Corinthian columns. Western Civ.

An all-night omelet shop cast a sallow glow across the motel parking lot. It looked like a place Edward Hopper might have gone to sketch a solitary diner. Except that the restaurant was packed.

"

I’m reading Confederates in the Attic and it’s kind of killing me because in a lot of ways it’s a great book that still holds up 15 years later, but some of Tony Horwitz’s first-person creative nonfiction bullshit is just so, so bad.

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"It’s not a healthy thing, what’s happening with this generation. They ‘get laid,’ they ‘screw,’ and those expressions express just about what they do. A lot of grabbing and pawing, but very little touching."

Uncle Jerry in Philip Roth’s “Letting Go” (1962).

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Discussion of diaphragms in “Goodbye, Columbus.”

Discussion of diaphragms in “Goodbye, Columbus.”

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thetangential:

How we party. (at SooLocal)

thetangential:

How we party. (at SooLocal)

Reblogged from thetangential with 22 notes | Permalink



"We talked about Marie Calloway, and about Megan Boyle (a writer whose relationship with Lin was among the inspirations for Taipei), and about why the writing of authors like Lin and Calloway rubs a lot of people the wrong way. Part of that is to do with the substance of each writer’s work (questions of gender and power, for example, come into play), but part of it is—I suggested—a disconnect between people who regard tweets as ‘writing’ and those who don’t. One reason Lin is so beloved by the online creative writing community is that he’s both demonstrated and argued for the legitimacy of online writing, including private writing like chat messages, as a compelling means of literary expression and human connection.”


I wrote about leading a Q&A with Tao Lin in Minneapolis.

"We talked about Marie Calloway, and about Megan Boyle (a writer whose relationship with Lin was among the inspirations for Taipei), and about why the writing of authors like Lin and Calloway rubs a lot of people the wrong way. Part of that is to do with the substance of each writer’s work (questions of gender and power, for example, come into play), but part of it is—I suggested—a disconnect between people who regard tweets as ‘writing’ and those who don’t. One reason Lin is so beloved by the online creative writing community is that he’s both demonstrated and argued for the legitimacy of online writing, including private writing like chat messages, as a compelling means of literary expression and human connection.”

I wrote about leading a Q&A with Tao Lin in Minneapolis.

18 notes | Permalink

Last night at his Minneapolis reading, Tao Lin signed a book for Garrison Keillor.
Keillor owns Common Good Books, which co-presented the event with Paper Darts (watch for my post about the event on the Paper Darts blog). Lin said his parents are fans of Keillor’s.

Last night at his Minneapolis reading, Tao Lin signed a book for Garrison Keillor.

Keillor owns Common Good Books, which co-presented the event with Paper Darts (watch for my post about the event on the Paper Darts blog). Lin said his parents are fans of Keillor’s.

137 notes | Permalink