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Writer, editor, etc. For more information, see jaygabler.com.

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The motel alarm jolted me awake. I lay staring at the digital red 4:00 winking from beside the bed, wondering where I was. Corinth. Corinth, Mississippi. Corinthian columns. Western Civ.

An all-night omelet shop cast a sallow glow across the motel parking lot. It looked like a place Edward Hopper might have gone to sketch a solitary diner. Except that the restaurant was packed.

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I’m reading Confederates in the Attic and it’s kind of killing me because in a lot of ways it’s a great book that still holds up 15 years later, but some of Tony Horwitz’s first-person creative nonfiction bullshit is just so, so bad.

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"It’s not a healthy thing, what’s happening with this generation. They ‘get laid,’ they ‘screw,’ and those expressions express just about what they do. A lot of grabbing and pawing, but very little touching."

Uncle Jerry in Philip Roth’s “Letting Go” (1962).

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Discussion of diaphragms in “Goodbye, Columbus.”

Discussion of diaphragms in “Goodbye, Columbus.”

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thetangential:

How we party. (at SooLocal)

thetangential:

How we party. (at SooLocal)

Reblogged from thetangential with 22 notes | Permalink



"We talked about Marie Calloway, and about Megan Boyle (a writer whose relationship with Lin was among the inspirations for Taipei), and about why the writing of authors like Lin and Calloway rubs a lot of people the wrong way. Part of that is to do with the substance of each writer’s work (questions of gender and power, for example, come into play), but part of it is—I suggested—a disconnect between people who regard tweets as ‘writing’ and those who don’t. One reason Lin is so beloved by the online creative writing community is that he’s both demonstrated and argued for the legitimacy of online writing, including private writing like chat messages, as a compelling means of literary expression and human connection.”


I wrote about leading a Q&A with Tao Lin in Minneapolis.

"We talked about Marie Calloway, and about Megan Boyle (a writer whose relationship with Lin was among the inspirations for Taipei), and about why the writing of authors like Lin and Calloway rubs a lot of people the wrong way. Part of that is to do with the substance of each writer’s work (questions of gender and power, for example, come into play), but part of it is—I suggested—a disconnect between people who regard tweets as ‘writing’ and those who don’t. One reason Lin is so beloved by the online creative writing community is that he’s both demonstrated and argued for the legitimacy of online writing, including private writing like chat messages, as a compelling means of literary expression and human connection.”

I wrote about leading a Q&A with Tao Lin in Minneapolis.

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Last night at his Minneapolis reading, Tao Lin signed a book for Garrison Keillor.
Keillor owns Common Good Books, which co-presented the event with Paper Darts (watch for my post about the event on the Paper Darts blog). Lin said his parents are fans of Keillor’s.

Last night at his Minneapolis reading, Tao Lin signed a book for Garrison Keillor.

Keillor owns Common Good Books, which co-presented the event with Paper Darts (watch for my post about the event on the Paper Darts blog). Lin said his parents are fans of Keillor’s.

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Next week I’ll be the Q end (mostly) of a Q&A with Tao Lin at the Paper Darts pop-up storefront in Minneapolis.

Next week I’ll be the Q end (mostly) of a Q&A with Tao Lin at the Paper Darts pop-up storefront in Minneapolis.

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Google image searching Emily Dickinson turned out to be a surprising journey. Who’s the target audience for that trucker hat?

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emilybooks:

Jay: Right now, I think Minnesota is a great place for readers and writers, but it hasn’t necessarily always been that way. Three of our most famous writers—F. Scott Fitzgerald, Charles Schulz, and Garrison Keillor—all had deeply conflicted feelings about Minnesota. All three left Minnesota with the intention of never returning, though all three eventually came back for varying amounts of time.

In recent years, though, Minnesota’s literary center of gravity has moved from St. Paul (where Fitzgerald and Schulz were from, and where Keillor now lives and pontificates) to Minneapolis, and the Twin Cities are now home to a strong nexus of independent publishers (Graywolf PressMilkweed EditionsCoffee House Press) and bookstores (Magers & Quinn, Keillor’s Common Good Books). The Open Book complex in downtown Minneapolis has become a central hub of literary life, and organizations like Paper Darts are supporting a very social literary culture that bridges online and IRL. The Twin Cities also have strong spoken word, storytelling, and hip-hop scenes, and there’s a very fluid boundary between being a “rapper” and an “author.”

Louise Erdrich doesn’t rap (yet), but her life and career illustrate what’s exciting about Minnesota’s literary scene today. She writes, she reads, she runs an independent bookstore, and she’s an inspiration to writers from all backgrounds, especially women writers and Native writers. She’s a hell of a lot happier here than F. Scott Fitzgerald ever was.

These comments from an interview with Emily Gould are germane to a piece I just wrote about The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald, and writers who got the hell out of Minnesota.

Reblogged from emilybooks with 22 notes | Permalink

Twin Cities book lovers—especially Twin Cities lovers of books that inspire questions like “What is the status of the ‘queer novel’ today?” and “Do we really exist?”—join us!

Twin Cities book lovers—especially Twin Cities lovers of books that inspire questions like “What is the status of the ‘queer novel’ today?” and “Do we really exist?”—join us!

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