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Discrimination Pong is a two-player game by Anna Anthropy about privilege and the myth that everyone is equally capable of succeeding in a capitalist society. It’s unsurprisingly an asymmetrical game: like pong, the players use rectangular “paddles” to try and return a bouncing square ball. But while the right player, who not coincidentally plays the white paddle, enjoys consistent playing conditions, the left player is subjected to a series of handicaps: slowed down, shortened, or straight-up made immaterial. At the end of the game, the left player is told to “work harder,” a message which disregards the obvious ways the odds have been rigged against that player.

Discrimination Pong is a two-player game by Anna Anthropy about privilege and the myth that everyone is equally capable of succeeding in a capitalist society. It’s unsurprisingly an asymmetrical game: like pong, the players use rectangular “paddles” to try and return a bouncing square ball. But while the right player, who not coincidentally plays the white paddle, enjoys consistent playing conditions, the left player is subjected to a series of handicaps: slowed down, shortened, or straight-up made immaterial. At the end of the game, the left player is told to “work harder,” a message which disregards the obvious ways the odds have been rigged against that player.

Reblogged from girlsgetbusyzine with 274 notes | Permalink

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893thecurrent:

“30 years ago today,” acknowledged Prince with a sly smile as the artist who’s previously downplayed the occasion’s significance segued from “Let’s Go Crazy” into “Take Me with U” on Saturday night at Paisley Park.
read Jay Gabler’s review

893thecurrent:

“30 years ago today,” acknowledged Prince with a sly smile as the artist who’s previously downplayed the occasion’s significance segued from “Let’s Go Crazy” into “Take Me with U” on Saturday night at Paisley Park.

read Jay Gabler’s review

Reblogged from 893thecurrent with 10 notes | Permalink

893thecurrent:

“The Zenith City of the Unsalted Seas (a nickname bestowed in 1868 by newspaperman Thomas Preston Foster) is about much more than taconite, but the mining and shipping industries continue to define the city in the national imagination—and to shape its urban landscape. When I was growing up in Duluth in the 1980s, I was awed by the towering mountains of taconite pellets, the vast ore ships, and the giant trucks with tires taller than I was.
"On the banks of the Great Lake stretching to the horizon—local meteorologists providing separate weather forecasts for ‘inland’ and ‘by the lake shore’—everything was big, from the anchors we climbed on at Canal Park to the flocks of seagulls we fed there. My dream of a seagull following our car home and staying to live in our house on Woodland Avenue never came true, but I still have a handful of Christmas ornaments attesting to my short-lived fascination with those gregarious grey-and-white fowl.
"I didn’t know very much about Duluth’s music scene: for me as a grade-schooler, Duluth music was ‘Time After Time’ and ‘We Are the World’ on MTV, and booming ads for THE LAST PLACE ON EARTH, where you could go to buy the hottest new cassettes. (Christmas shopping for my cousin, my mom walked up to the counter and asked if they had a copy of Heart by Bad Animals.) The only live music I remember seeing was a polka band at Ironworld.
"The great local music scene that was off my radar as a kid is definitely on my radar now—mine, and everyone’s."
keep reading—and join us in Duluth today!

Can you tell this picture was taken just before the L.A. Olympics?

893thecurrent:

The Zenith City of the Unsalted Seas (a nickname bestowed in 1868 by newspaperman Thomas Preston Foster) is about much more than taconite, but the mining and shipping industries continue to define the city in the national imagination—and to shape its urban landscape. When I was growing up in Duluth in the 1980s, I was awed by the towering mountains of taconite pellets, the vast ore ships, and the giant trucks with tires taller than I was.

"On the banks of the Great Lake stretching to the horizon—local meteorologists providing separate weather forecasts for ‘inland’ and ‘by the lake shore’—everything was big, from the anchors we climbed on at Canal Park to the flocks of seagulls we fed there. My dream of a seagull following our car home and staying to live in our house on Woodland Avenue never came true, but I still have a handful of Christmas ornaments attesting to my short-lived fascination with those gregarious grey-and-white fowl.

"I didn’t know very much about Duluth’s music scene: for me as a grade-schooler, Duluth music was ‘Time After Time’ and ‘We Are the World’ on MTV, and booming ads for THE LAST PLACE ON EARTH, where you could go to buy the hottest new cassettes. (Christmas shopping for my cousin, my mom walked up to the counter and asked if they had a copy of Heart by Bad Animals.) The only live music I remember seeing was a polka band at Ironworld.

"The great local music scene that was off my radar as a kid is definitely on my radar now—mine, and everyone’s."

keep reading—and join us in Duluth today!

Can you tell this picture was taken just before the L.A. Olympics?

Reblogged from 893thecurrent with 2 notes | Permalink

Thanks for that last sentence.

Thanks for that last sentence.

(Source: twitter.com)

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How many ways can you hold a violin in a promo shot?

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The expression of this kid who had 232 teeth removed is the absolute definition of FML.

The expression of this kid who had 232 teeth removed is the absolute definition of FML.

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Far be it from me to say we could have seen this coming, but…

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"A strong sense of place informs the music of the composer John Luther Adams, who won a Pulitzer Prize this year, be it the Pacific Ocean, the Sonoran Desert, or the plains of his adopted Alaska."

Wow, I didn’t realize the kind of real estate you could win for being a renowned composer. (New York Times)

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Crimes and Misdemeanors (1989)

  • Lester: You haven't worked in a long time.
  • Cliff: I have worked! It's just that nobody's paying me.

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