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  • Me: Are you going to join Ello?
  • Dana: 'Ell no!

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This Saturday, Sept. 27, is the inaugural Cassette Store Day. It’s inspired many to think back on their many audiocassette memories. Here are ten of mine.

This Saturday, Sept. 27, is the inaugural Cassette Store Day. It’s inspired many to think back on their many audiocassette memories. Here are ten of mine.

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I made a playlist of classical music to listen to in the fall, because SEASONS.

I made a playlist of classical music to listen to in the fall, because SEASONS.

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In which I notice I’m standing behind Craig Finn and Jill Riley at the Replacements tailgate, then try to make a smooth exit.

(Source: blog.thecurrent.org)

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socimages:

Exceptional American beliefs about mobility and inequality.
By Lisa Wade, PhD
The figure above contrasts the average U.S. response to various questions measuring perceptions of mobility and inequality with the average response of 27 comparison countries (from the International Social Survey Programme).  
In other words, how far from the mean are U.S. citizens’ beliefs about life chances and the value of social inequality?  The pink triangle is the U.S. and the orange line is everyone else.  It’s a bit difficult to read (click to enlarge), so I’ll describe the data:
About 62% of Americans think that “people get rewarded for their effort,” compared to about 35% of citizens in our national comparison group.
About 70% of Americans think that “people get rewarded for their intelligence and skills,” compared to about 40% of citizens in our national comparison group.
About 19% of Americans think that “coming from a wealthy family is essential/very important to getting ahead,” compared to about 29% of citizens in our national comparison group.
About 62% of Americans think that “differences in income in their country are too large,” compared to about 87% of citizens in our national comparison group.
And about 33% of Americans think that “it is the responsibility of the government to reduce the differences in income,” compared to about 69% of citizens in our national comparison group.
Americans, then, are much more likely than the average citizen in our comparison countries to believe that individual characteristics determine success, wide gaps in income are acceptable, and the government should let them be.   No wonder Americans tend to vote to cut taxes and services, tolerate unequal educational opportunity, and resist top-down solutions to inequality.  They think inequality is good and that individuals will always get what they deserve.
Like I said, “stunning,” given the depth of our income inequality and the data on class mobility.  Though it makes perfect sense in light of our deep and abiding patriotism.
Via the MontClair SocioBlog.
Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the co-author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

socimages:

Exceptional American beliefs about mobility and inequality.

By Lisa Wade, PhD

The figure above contrasts the average U.S. response to various questions measuring perceptions of mobility and inequality with the average response of 27 comparison countries (from the International Social Survey Programme).  

In other words, how far from the mean are U.S. citizens’ beliefs about life chances and the value of social inequality?  The pink triangle is the U.S. and the orange line is everyone else.  It’s a bit difficult to read (click to enlarge), so I’ll describe the data:

  • About 62% of Americans think that “people get rewarded for their effort,” compared to about 35% of citizens in our national comparison group.
  • About 70% of Americans think that “people get rewarded for their intelligence and skills,” compared to about 40% of citizens in our national comparison group.
  • About 19% of Americans think that “coming from a wealthy family is essential/very important to getting ahead,” compared to about 29% of citizens in our national comparison group.
  • About 62% of Americans think that “differences in income in their country are too large,” compared to about 87% of citizens in our national comparison group.
  • And about 33% of Americans think that “it is the responsibility of the government to reduce the differences in income,” compared to about 69% of citizens in our national comparison group.

Americans, then, are much more likely than the average citizen in our comparison countries to believe that individual characteristics determine success, wide gaps in income are acceptable, and the government should let them be.   No wonder Americans tend to vote to cut taxes and services, tolerate unequal educational opportunity, and resist top-down solutions to inequality.  They think inequality is good and that individuals will always get what they deserve.

Like I said, “stunning,” given the depth of our income inequality and the data on class mobility.  Though it makes perfect sense in light of our deep and abiding patriotism.

Via the MontClair SocioBlog.

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the co-author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

Reblogged from socimages with 100 notes | Permalink

JD McPherson performs in The Current studio

You can hear me in this session, along with several of my colleagues, as a handclapper trying to sound festive rather than nervous.

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"It’s the first fall color! Now it’s going to spread like a disease."

Dana

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"Yesterday someone was sitting in the store painting her toenails…but even that wasn’t as bad as the guy in the cafe the other day who was using a cigarette lighter to burn the callouses off his feet."

Life at Barnes & Noble

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893thecurrent:

Re: Martin Devaney plays the Replacements for someone who’s never heard the Replacements.
The Friends band is the Rembrandts—who are also making a comeback. Coincidence?

893thecurrent:

Re: Martin Devaney plays the Replacements for someone who’s never heard the Replacements.

The Friends band is the Rembrandts—who are also making a comeback. Coincidence?

Reblogged from 893thecurrent with 6 notes | Permalink

Beyoncé released every new song with a video; I was expecting U2 to release every new song with a feature-length documentary that it plays over the closing credits of.

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